Monday, February 11, 2013

Krakow, Poland

Wawel Cathedral in Krakow.

Day 6 (Wednesday, September 10th, 2008)


My overnight train from Prague arrived in Krakow at 6:30 after an eight hour journey. I wasn't able to get much sleep since the train was constantly stopping or slamming on the breaks. I guess I probably received two to three hours; needless to say, I was exhausted when I got off that train!

The early morning air in Krakow that greeted me was cold and crisp but helped to wake me up. I walked down to the main terminal with the friends I had made on the train and took some Polish Zlotys out from the ATM.

I continued along until I reached the tram stops, where I bought a 2.5 Zloty ticket from a machine. Krakow is filled with a ton of efficient trams that can whisk you all over the city cheaply and quickly. It seems that very few tourists take advantage of the inexpensive transportation as I appeared to be the only non-local on the tram. I said goodbye to my train friends (as they were headed in a different direction) and then boarded my tram, which like all others in the city, was three cars long. Unfortunately, as it was close to the beginning of the work day, it was filled to the brim with people headed to work, so I had to stand with my luggage. The ride only took about ten minutes, where I was dropped off only a few minutes’ walk from my hotel.

I had booked a room at Cracowdays Apartments, which was very highly rated on Trip Advisor. The website had claimed that it was only a five minute walk away from the main square of the old town, although I would later find out that it actually took about 12 minutes.

When I arrived at the hotel, it was around 7:45, but the hotel personnel did not arrive until 8:00, so I waited outside for 15 minutes. Once inside, I was told that my room was available and that I could go ahead and check in! Initially, I was told I was going to have to wait until 14:00 and just store my luggage, so the weary traveler in me was very excited to hear this news. I stayed in the room for about an hour, attempting to freshen up from the long train ride and force myself to get ready for another day of sightseeing on very little sleep; this seemed to be a common occurrence on the trip! On a positive note, Cracowdays Apartments was very nice inside with a communal kitchen and a nicely decorated room with a very comfortable bed!
Cracowdays Apartments in Krakow.
Cracowdays Apartments in Krakow.

From the hotel, I walked towards Rynek Glowny, which is the main market square. I was slightly disappointed at first glance as the centerpiece of the square, Sukiennice-Cloth Hall, was under renovation and slightly hidden behind steel, coverings, and a crane. I walked around the corner of the hall and viewed the rest of the square. I saw many baroque buildings that lined the square including the beautiful and tall St. Mary’s Church on one end and Town Hall Tower on the other, both of which seemed to anchor the square. I also saw many different types of people enjoying the vast open space ranging from the typical tourist to the business men of Krakow hurrying as they walked along. There were also several flower stands selling different types of flower bouquets.
Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Town Hall Tower in Krakow's Rynek Glowny
Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
St. Mary's Basilica in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
St. Mary's Basilica in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Flowers for sale in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Flowers for sale in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.

From here, I walked north to the Barbican, which was the gateway that was once connected to the massive wall that was built around the city limits during the late 1200’s in an attempt to save the city from invaders. I paid 6 Zloty in order to walk along a short passage of the fortification. Originally, the structure had 47 watchtowers and eight gates; today, only a few of each remain including the beautiful St. Florian's Gate. Most of the wall fell into disrepair in the late 19th century and was torn down and turned into the large Planty Park that now surrounds the entire 2.5 miles around the perimeter of Old Town.
St. Florian's Gate of Krakow.
St. Florian's Gate of Krakow.
Barbican of Krakow.
Passing underneath St. Florian's Gate looking towards the Barbican.
Traditional music being played in Krakow.
The fortification surrounding old town Krakow.
Krakow
Krakow
The fortification and St. Florian's Gate surrounding old town Krakow.
Krakow
The fortification surrounding old town Krakow.

Afterward, I walked back towards Old Town, along Florianska Street. The street was filled to the brim with tourists but also somehow managed to retain its charm; some of the architecture along here was very pretty.
Florianska Street in Krakow.
Krakow
St. Mary's Basilica in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
St. Mary's Basilica in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Krakow
Krakow


I then walked over to the Cloth Hall and wandered amongst its market, which was filled with many stalls selling all sorts of Polish tourist paraphernalia at overly expensive prices. Some of the items that I found in many of the stalls included chess sets, painted boxes, wood carvings, and decorative eggs. The cloth hall was first built in the 14th century as a place for cloth-sellers to display their goods. That building later burned down in 1555 and was replaced by the current building, which is in Italianate Renaissance style.
Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Interior of Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Items for sale at Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Items for sale at Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Items for sale at Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Items for sale at Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
View of Old Town Towner from Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Sukiennice (Cloth Hall) in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Old Town Tower in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Old Town Tower in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
A church in Krakow.
St. Mary's Basilica in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.
St. Mary's Basilica in Krakow's Rynek Glowny.

At this point, I was quite hungry so I decided to find a place for lunch. After reading my guidebook, I found a place called Polskie Smaki (Polish Flavors), which was a self-service cafeteria that served fast but traditional Polish food. I ordered borscht (traditional Polish soup made from a sourdough base and contains hard boiled eggs and pieces of sausage), two types of pierogi (Polish-style ravioli), and golabki (stuffed cabbage rolls with meat and rice). After ordering, I sat down to eat in the surprisingly elegant space, in which a few locals were also eating. I thought the borscht was okay and that the hard boiled egg in the soup threw off the flavor. I really liked the golabki and, strangely enough, the flavor reminded me of the Chinese wontons I make at home, as all of the same ingredients were used except that the polish version was cooked in cabbage leaves instead of a wonton wrapper. The piergoi were good and I preferred the one filled with meat to the ones filled with potatoes and cheese. Needless to say, I was quite full at the end of my lunch meal. Polish food is definitely thick and hearty and sits in your stomach like a ton of bricks!
Borscht from Polskie Smaki.
Golabki from Polskie Smaki.
Pierogi from Polskie Smaki.


After eating I began the long and hot walk to Wawel Hill, where the castle complex and Wawel Cathedral were located. I decided on visiting the Royal State Rooms since the English guided tickets to the Royal Private Apartments were sold out and no tour was required for the state rooms, unlike the private apartments, where a guided tour was mandated. Rick Steves described these rooms best, “While precious to the Poles, are mediocre by European standards." I’ll have to agree with his summarizing. I was not that impressed by the empty rooms, although they did become more interesting the further along I walked. The rooms at the end of the tour had ceilings made from decorated wood and beautiful leather-tooled walls with lots of tapestries.
Krakow
Krakow
Krakow
Krakow
Wawel Hill
Wawel Hill
Royal Castle on Wawel Hill.
Royal Castle on Wawel Hill.
Royal Castle on Wawel Hill.

After touring the rooms, I walked back outside in order to get some shots of the exterior of the gorgeous cathedral, which seemed to be a mismatch of styles that blended together beautifully.
Wawel Cathedral
Wawel Cathedral
Wawel Cathedral
Wawel Cathedral
Wawel Cathedral
Wawel Cathedral
Wawel Cathedral
Wawel Cathedral
Wawel Cathedral

Afterwards, I headed inside. The national church of Poland was quite large and filled with tombs containing most of the important rulers and historical figures from Poland’s history. As I was walking along the uneven church floors, I ran into my train friends! Given Krakow's size, I was surprised that we managed to bump into one another! We finished touring the church together, walked up to the bell tower (which wasn’t of much interest) and down into one of the crypts, which had two tombs inside.

Next, from the grounds of Wawel Hill, I walked down towards Old Town, along beautiful Kanonicza Street, which has been listed as being the oldest street in Krakow. On this same street I found a yellow house where Pope John Paul II lived for ten years after World War II.
Kanonicza Street in Krakow.
The home on Kanonicza Street where Pope John Paul II lived in Krakow.

Interesting tidbit about Krakow: the city has more churches per square mile than anywhere else in the world (outside of Rome). There are 142 churches and monasteries in the city, 32 of which are located in Old Town.

I eventually reached Grodzka Street, after walking through the small but pretty Mary Magdalene Square, which was once the main square in town when Krakow was only a small village. Grodzka Street is one of the main arterials from Old Town, and is filled with restaurants and shops catering to the tourists.
Mary Magdalene Square in Krakow.
Mary Magdalene Square in Krakow.
Mary Magdalene Square in Krakow.
Mary Magdalene Square in Krakow.

My last stop of the day was at St Francis’ Basilica, which had a surprisingly beautiful and unique Art Nouveau interior. The colorful building was also the home church of Pope John Paul II while he was archbishop of Krakow.
St. Francis' Basilica in Krakow.
St. Francis' Basilica in Krakow.
St. Francis' Basilica in Krakow.

From here, I walked through the square, stopping in a grocery store to buy some quick and easy things for a small dinner to would eat later at the hotel. I was exhausted and fell asleep at the hotel from 17:00 to 22:30, finally going back to sleep at 01:00. It had been another long and exhausting day.

Day 7 (Thursday, September 11th, 2008)

Today’s plan was to spend an entire day at the Auschwitz Concentration Camp, which was located about two hours outside of Krakow. There are several options available to get to Auschwitz, but I decided to take the train from central Krakow to the city of Oswiecim. From there, I took a five minute taxi ride to the camp.

As strange as it may sound, visiting Auschwitz was one of the things I was most looking forward to on the entire trip. As I am a huge World War II fan, actually being able to set foot on the same soil that I had read about in my textbooks or seen in movies and television was an amazing and exciting concept to me.

As the taxi driver dropped me off in front of the museum entrance at exactly 11:00, I rushed in as I had hoped to make the 11:00 English tour. Had I had not been able to, I would have waited another two hours for the next tour. Luckily, I did make it and only missed the first minute of the film that played at the beginning of the tour. The 17 minute movie was filmed by Ukrainian troops right after the Red Army liberated the camp in January of 1945; it showed graphic scenes and details from the grounds of the camp and many of the thinly starved prisoners.

After the video finished, I walked to the main hall where I met up with the English speaking Polish guide. Entrance to the site was actually free. However, to make the most of my visit, I felt it was important to participate in a tour as I knew that the guide would be extremely knowledgeable and able to make the place come to life. Since the English group was so large, they decided to split us into two smaller groups, which was a smart idea as over 60 people had signed up for the 11:00 tour.
The walking tour started very close to the famous gates that read “Arbeit Macht Frei” (Work Sets You Free). We all know too well that this message probably gave hope to the thousands of people that entered below it, only to quickly discover that it was a cruel and horrifying lie.
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Concentration Camp

As the grounds were filled with many visitors, all of us in the tour group had been given a headset so that the guide could speak quietly without any of us having difficulties hearing her. The tour path walked along the grounds of Auschwitz, weaving back and forth between the many barracks (known as blocks) which now contain exhibits filled with information on the camp such as where all of the prisoners came from, living conditions for prisoners, etc. All of the exhibits were wonderfully laid out and explained with descriptive and poignant words in both Polish and English.
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Execution wall at Auschwitz Concentration Camp.
Execution wall at Auschwitz Concentration Camp.
Students from Israel visiting Auschwitz Concentration Camp.
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Photos of some of the prisoners who were taken to Auschwitz Concentration Camp.
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Concentration Camp
Barbed wire fence at Auschwitz Concentration Camp.
Barbed wire fence at Auschwitz Concentration Camp.
The only standing crematorium at Auschwitz Concentration Camp.
The only standing gas chamber/crematorium at Auschwitz Concentration Camp.
Auschwitz Concentration Camp

Of all the many displays I encountered, the ones that had the greatest effect on me were the wall of victim’s hair and the massive display cases of people’s shoes. Personally, I consider the human hair to be the most physical form left of all the artifacts from the Holocaust that directly correlates with the millions of lives that were lost. As you view the massive amount of hair, you can easily pick out each woman’s pile of hair; for each pile, you then connect that with a life. There was a living, breathing person to whom each pile of hair was once attached to. And the life of every single one of those people whose hair now sits in that display case was systematically ended by the Nazis in an attempt to exterminate their race.

Secondly, the thousands of shoes I viewed made me think about the lives that were cut so abruptly short. As I looked at each pair, I thought of the happy times some of the women or young girls may have had when they originally purchased the shoes, not knowing the horror that would eventually fill their lives. My thoughts then turned to each person packing their bags immediately before they departed for Auschwitz, being told to bring only their most important personal belongings and thinking that they were going to someplace better, a place filled with hope. Lastly, I thought about the millions of steps those shoes were never able to take; I’ve always wondered that of the millions of people that were killed during the Holocaust, what would life be like today if none of them had ever been killed? Would we have a cure for cancer, or maybe for AIDS? Could the world have been a better place? How would life itself be different than what we know of it today? These are questions we will never have the answer to but ones that will always be pondered by humanity for the rest of eternity, or at least I hope.

After about two hours at Auschwitz, my group took a five minute bus ride over to the second camp, called Birkenau. Let me preface by stating that Birkenau is huge, and huge being a relative term. When I arrived at the gates and I saw that the camp went on and on, and even further than what I could physically see. I was completely shocked and blown away. I knew the camps were large, but I had absolutely no idea about the massive scale to which they were built. I cannot even begin to imagine what the prisoners must have thought or felt when those trains passed through the entry gate to Birkenau and they saw the hundreds of wooden and brick barracks that lay before their eyes.
The train tracks at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Ruins of inmates' barracks at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
Ruins of inmates' barracks at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Ruins of a crematorium at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
Guard tower at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Central sauna building at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
The Canada section at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp, where buildings used to stand that stored the inmates clothing and other personal items.
Central sauna building at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
Steam chambers located inside the central sauna building used to disinfect inmate's clothes at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
A photo memorial inside the central sauna building at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp
Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp

One of the things my group toured at Birkenau was a wood barrack that served as the latrine. The front portion of the barrack served as the “washroom” while the back half was filled with rows of pit toilets. The prisoners would have immediately lost all sense of insecurities as there was absolutely no privacy here; using the bathroom would have had to have been an incredibly humiliating experience. The worst thing I learned about the bathroom "business" was that the prisoners were only allowed to use it TWICE each day; once in the morning and again in the evening. On top of that, I was told that the SS officers would stand at the end of the row of toilets and count to 5 and then the prisoners would have to remove themselves from the toilet. 10 seconds each day to complete your business? How is this even humanely possible? All of this coupled with the fact that most of the prisoners also had constant diarrhea? I cannot begin to fathom how they survived this…
Pit toilets at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.

My tour group also walked into another wood barrack that served as the sleeping quarters. There were several hundred of these same kinds of barracks, and each contained dozens of beds (stacked three beds high). On each row, it was not uncommon for eight people to sleep across; what this all adds up to is 1000 prisoners per building. Life wasn’t any better for the prisoners at night though; most would vie for a place to sleep on the top row of the three story bunk bed. Those that weren’t able to get the highest spot spent the night sleeping as those above them emptied their bowels on top of them; because of the rampant diarrhea in the camps, most people weren’t able to control their bowels. Each barrack only had one or two buckets for people to use, and needless to say, those filled up quickly. Remember, the prisoners were only allowed to use the bathrooms twice each day at specified times, so at some point, they just had to go. Again, I cannot begin to comprehend the utter humiliation these people had to face every single day they lived at the horrific concentration camps…
Sleeping quarters at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
Sleeping quarters at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
Sleeping quarters at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.
Sleeping quarters at Auschwitz Birkenau Concentration Camp.

Viewing all of this firsthand was an eerie and haunting experience; knowing that I was walking along the same path where so much life and death had been decided upon was almost too much for me to bear. Much of the time I spent at the two camps is difficult for me to describe in words. It was a profound and deeply moving experience that forced me into many reflective and contemplative moments of thought. I will never forget the time I spent at Auschwitz; it was a life-altering experience that has forever changed the way I think about the term Holocaust.

With all of the horror, terror, and indescribable injustices that the Nazi regime forced upon millions of people, we must not allow the millions of deaths and victims to be in vain. We all must learn from history’s mistakes and prevent the same from happening again. The Holocaust should also help us realize that life is short and that it is incredibly important to make the most of every single day we are alive as no one knows how long it may last. I can only imagine how different this world would be if every single human being was required to visit a concentration camp.

Some random but interesting facts I learned during my tour at Auschwitz and Birkenau:
  • Auschwitz and Birkenau (Aushwitz II) are actually two separate camps that are located only a few miles from one another. When the Nazis decided that Auschwitz was too small for the death operation they had envisioned, they decided to build a new camp on nearby farming fields, but on a much larger scale. Originally, they had hoped that Birkenau would be able to hold 200,000 prisoners at any given time, but at its peak, it held half the amount they had projected.
  • Most of the Jews who entered the concentration camps were immediately put to death via the crematoriums; it was only during the last few years of the war that some of the Jews were spared when they were sent to work at the camps. Otherwise, most of the victims who lived at the camps were Soviet prisoners of war, scholars, students, the physically disabled or mentally ill, Gypsies, Russians, Poles, and anyone else deemed a “threat” to the Nazi regime.
  • The hair that was displayed in the cases I discussed above was removed after all women were killed and used for making items such as cloth, which was used to make Nazi uniforms. I was also told that at one point, the Nazis had attempted to make soap from the body fat of some of the victims. The Nazis looked at every part of the body as a possible way to make a profit.
  • As prisoners arrived at the camps, whether they were sent to death immediately or selected to “live," their luggage was taken by workers to an area in Birkenau called “Canada” where it was immediately sorted. All money or highly valuable items (i.e. jewelry, watches, etc) were sent to the banks in Germany while items such as clothing, pottery, and even toothbrushes were sent to families in Germany to reuse.
  • 7500 survivors were found when the camp was liberated in 1945. Of those, 20% died only a few days later of disease and starvation that had gone too far.
While the size of Auschwitz may seem large to most, nearby Birkenau was 20 times as big.

Day 8 (Friday, September 12th, 2008)

During my last day in Krakow, I decided to visit the nearby Wieliczka Salt Mine, which was located 10 miles southeast of the city. There are no direct trains to the mine so I took one of the minibuses that leave from various points around Krakow. The ride to the mines only cost 2.50 Zloty ($1) and I arrived about 20 minutes later.
Wieliczka Salt Mine

All those interested in visiting the mine must pay for a guided tour, which cost 68 Zloty per person ($28), very pricey by the usually cheap Polish standards. I also paid an extra 10 Zloty to have permission to take photos.

The Wieliczka Salt Mine has been producing salt since the 11th century. Hundreds of years ago, salt was considered one of the most precious (and expensive!) things in life as it was required to preserve food from spoiling. Poland used these deposits to their advantage and became a very wealthy country under the rule of Kazimierz the Great.

The tour began by descending over 380 wooden stairs down 210 feet from a winding staircase that made everyone very dizzy. From here, I walked past 20 of the 2000 chambers that miners dug during the last several hundred years. Some of those chambers were filled with sculptures and figurines that were carved by the 19th century miners who spent much of their lives underground. The temperature down in the mines is a constant 57 degrees, so I was glad to have brought my jacket with me. I did see some walls covered in thick white salt, but not as much as I had hoped for. I continued walking downhill and down several hundred more stairs until eventually came to St. Kinga’s Chapel, which was filled with beautiful salt chandeliers and more artistic sculptures, including a copy of the Last Supper.
Salt encrusted walls at Wieliczka Salt Mine.
Salt encrusted walls at Wieliczka Salt Mine.
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Wieliczka Salt Mine
Salt encrusted walls at Wieliczka Salt Mine.
Wieliczka Salt Mine

Eventually, the tour ended in an area with lots of stores and a restaurant specifically geared for the tourists. I steered clear ahead and left, but not before first ascending the mine via an elevator. Thank God for the elevator because there was no way I would have been able to climb up 800 stairs.

From the mine, I took another minibus into Krakow, getting off in Kazimierz (Jewish Quarter). Although there were several different Synagogues in the area, I wasn't super interested in visiting the sites since I had thoroughly seen the Jewish Quarter in Prague several days prior. Instead, I planned to visit the nearby Polish Folk Museum. On the way to the museum, I stopped in at Restauracja Samoobslugowa Polakowski for lunch, which was a Polish milk bar serving traditional Polish fare. I ordered roast pork with potatoes and meat piergoi. The total came to 22 Zloty total, which was only $10!
Roast Pork and Potato dish at Samoobslugowa Polakowski in Krakow.

Feeling stuffed, I left and continued the walk to the museum. I was looking very much forward to the visit as I had read that the museum contained models of traditional rural Polish homes, including interiors, and other items such as Polish folk costumes and holiday celebrations: exactly the type of museum this history buff loves! Unfortunately, when I walked up to the entrance doors, I discovered that it was closed for renovations until November; very disappointing!

Next, I planned to visit Schindler’s Factory, which was one of the settings for the movie “Schindler’s List." Although the factory went out of business several years ago, I had read that it was currently undergoing renovation and that part of the building had already been turned into a museum; this was obviously not the case. As my taxi pulled up to the factory door, there was absolutely nothing done. From what I could see, it was a completely empty building. Apparently, the museum eventually opened about 21 months after my trip in June 2010 and appears to be a very awesome and interesting place to visit.

From here, I went back to my apartment, picked up my bags, and found a place outside of old town to complete some laundry.

Next, I traveled to the main train station to wait for the 22:30 overnight departure to Budapest, Hungary. Yes, you saw that right. I somehow managed to sign myself up for yet ANOTHER overnight train ride. Since I got to the train station several hours prior to my train arriving, I took advantage of the extra time by visiting the nearby mall, which was actually attached to the train station.

I was finally able to board the train about 45 minutes prior to departure. As I brought my bags on board, I saw no one else was on the train yet, so I was keeping my fingers crossed that I might have the compartment all to myself. Unfortunately, that did not end up being the case. In fact, the train was completely sold out so my compartment was filled with six people total. However, unlike the previous night train I had experienced, I actually got a decent amount of sleep on this night’s ride. I’m not exactly sure why, but assume it had something to do with the fact that I already knew what to expect from an overnight train ride and the beds themselves were slightly more comfortable than the first ones I had slept on.
Overnight train compartment in Krakow.
Up next: Eger, Hungary

3 comments:

  1. I'm really enjoying reading your Eastern Europe posts. Sadly I've never made it "west" of Italy ha. But it is a region I can't wait to visit although hopefully when I do go, I'll have the time to do it right like you (i.e. a month).

    And you did a wonderful job in your description about Auschwitz. I'm sure it is the toughest thing in the world to see and even tougher to write about.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This is a good post. I hope to see Auschwitz someday soon. We are going to Europe for our honeymoon.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Poland such a beautiful developed country there is a great places thats call natural beauti country
    and i have seen there i perfect comfort accommodation for student or visitor..
    thank for sharing valuable post..

    UCLAN student accommodation | International student accommodation in Preston

    ReplyDelete

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